Learn What Different Types Of Fish Taste Like And What Pairs Well With Each, Part Two

In part one of this two part series about various fish and their flavor profiles, we only had the time to analyze cod and mahi mahi. That is mostly our fault, as we got a bit caught up highlighting what Mulligan’s has to offer within and beyond the seafood world. With so many things to talk about, we hope that our readers won’t hold it against us for too long. Especially because at the end of this article, we will again highlight a few different features about our beloved waterfront restaurant(s). But for now, just know that our locations of Vero Beach, Jensen Beach, and Lake Worth all have fantastic seafood and more, with each being a family restaurant where anyone and everyone can find a little bit of fun and a whole lot of great food.

Today we will continue our discussion on our favorite fish, most of which you can find at, you guessed, it Mulligan’s Beach House Bar and Grill. Let’s get going!

The Grouper Fish

Grouper are part of perhaps the largest family of fish in the world, the sea bass family. If you’ve had Grouper before, it’s very likely it was either Gag or Red Grouper, as those are the most commonly caught. As you may have guessed, the grouper fish is very common within Florida seas, in addition to being found in the Gulf of Mexico, Central America, the Mid-Atlantic States, and even South America.

Taste And Preparation

With a mild, sweet flavor, somewhere in between seabass and halibut, grouper ends up cooking to be more firm than many other kinds of fish. Yet at the same time it locks its moisture in well, with big flakes and a well-rounded flavor.

Typically, chefs prefer to cook with the Red Grouper, but if prepared correctly, any kind of grouper can dazzle the taste buds. A classic southern method of preparation is to blacken it. Blackening it on a grill (what we recommend if you are new to this technique), and adding the classic sides of black beans and rice makes this a treat the whole family can enjoy. Plus, it doesn’t take all day to cook or clean up!

Whatever your method of choice, a good rule of thumb (along with many other kinds of fish, to be fair) is to cook for ten minutes for every inch of thickness, with the oven temperature being somewhere between 400-450 degree F. Substitutions for grouper include red snapper and Mahi Mahi.

And while we are talking about the Florida Grouper, try our own entree, and get Fresh Florida Grouper either blackened or grilled, topped with our in-house Pineapple Salsa. If you are feeling like grouper but you still want some lobster and crab at the same time (greedy, but we can’t blame you), try our Crabby Grouper dish. It comes with a Fresh Grouper filet, topped with lobster sauce and paired with a delicious crab cake. If we are talking about bites to remember, this is certainly one that will rank highly on your all-time list.

Ahi Tuna

Also referred to as Yellowfin and Bigeye Tuna, Ahi Tuna is most commonly found in Hawaii. It has a similar flavor profile to Albacore Tuna or Salmon, yet is often served rare in order to maintain its natural distinctiveness. Another reason to serve this fish rare is that it dries out quickly and is easy to overcook. So if you are going to ride that edge, try to get it with just a touch of pink remaining in the middle.

Taste And Preparation

Ahi tuna is both mild and firm, like many other first. But unlike some kinds, it also has a full and even hearty flavor. You can prepare Ahi Tuna in a variety of ways, but three of the most common are as follows.

  • Sear Your Tuna – heat a pan until it is very hot with oil (pro-tip; coconut oil has a very high smoke point, and is wildly healthy for you in a variety of ways), slap your tuna steaks on the pan, and cooked, uncovered, for between 6 and 9 minutes. Flip once halfway through, and don’t forget your spices, which we will get to later.
  • Bake Your Tuna – quite simply, stick it on a greased baking sheet in an oven at 450 degree for around five minutes. Boom town.
  • Grill Your Tuna – brush your tuna with oil, and grill on the highest heat settings you’ve got, for around 4 minutes on each side.

Spices And Sides

Whichever method you prefer, Ahi Tuna goes great with dill, tarragon, parsley, fennel, rosemary, and even goes great when marinated in soy sauce. Play around with a couple of different combinations to find out which one you prefer. In terms of sides and wine-pairing, our ideal meal to go with Ahi Tuna includes roasted potatoes, a leafy salad, and a Chardonnay. If, however, you are looking to go towards the rare side of preparation, allow us to do the heavy lifting by trying our Blackened Seared Tuna. Once you’ve tried that at Mulligan’s, it might be hard to convince you to try some of our other great menu items at any one of our beach restaurants!

On Our Next Episode

We initially started this series as not a series, but just a one-off about a few of our favorite kinds of fish, some of which we serve here at Mulligan’s Beach House Bar and Grill. Then, once we got in the weeds a little bit, decided to make a two part series out of it. Now, we’ve realized we have yet to discuss lobster, crabs, or shrimp! We can’t exclude those, so next time we will be talking about those mouthwatering crustaceans.

But whether you are a seafood fan or not, we want you to stop on by any one of our 6 Mulligan’s tropical restaurant locations. Serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner 365 days a year, you can try our omelets, burgers, salads, french toast, nachos, onion rings, quesadillas, cheese steaks, sandwiches, soups, pastas, cocktails, wines, martinis, and much more. Try out these options and more at South Florida’s top restaurant, Mulligan’s!